Changes to taxation of termination payments

by Laurie Anstis on August 12, 2016

Following the budget announcement and consultation on proposals to reform taxation of termination payments, the government has now issued its response and put out for consultation detailed proposals on changes to taxation of termination payments. Read the rest of this entry »

The Briggs Report – the future of employment tribunals

by Laurie Anstis on July 27, 2016

Lord Justice Briggs has today published his final Civil Courts Structure Review report.

Much of the report is concerned with the future of the civil courts (including eye-catching proposals for a new online court), but at paragraph 11.11 onward he also touches on the future of the employment tribunal and employment appeal tribunal, given the current overlap in work between them and the civil courts. Read the rest of this entry »

#LawFest2016

by Laurie Anstis on July 26, 2016

LawFest is back for 2016.

What is LawFest? Organised by Paul Gilbert of LBC Wise Counsel, it is the antidote to legal conferences. It is for lawyers of every different kind, but is not about law. Drawing on experts from many different fields, it is a relaxed and informal event that opens up opportunities far removed from the daily work routine.

What’s going to happen? I don’t know, but I went to the inaugural event in 2014 and signed up as soon as I heard that there was an event for 2016.

LawFest is held in Cheltenham on 19 & 20 August. Tickets are available for either or both days, and there is further information and booking details here.

Perhaps the best guide for what to expect is Brian Inkster’s full write-up of the 2014 event here, and there are some more details for 2016 here.

Theresa May and David Davis on employment law after Brexit

by Laurie Anstis on July 14, 2016

One of the biggest questions for employment lawyers and HR managers over the next few years is going to be the shape of employment law after Brexit. With so much of our employment legislation derived from the EU, what will survive?

No-one knows, but we are starting to get some indications from the key players on their overall approach to employment rights.

Theresa May took the opportunity of her speech on appointment as Prime Minister to mention employment rights twice. She said:

If you’re from an ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people in Westminster realise. You have a job, but you don’t always have job security … We will do everything we can to give you more control over your lives.
Read the rest of this entry »

ACAS publishes research on conciliation

by Laurie Anstis on May 23, 2016

ACAS has just published a lengthy research paper on the effect of its conciliation processes in employment tribunal claims.

There is an enormous amount of material in the report for those interested in employment tribunal statistics. Particularly interesting in the light of the current debate around tribunal fees are the reasons given (at p66 – 69) for claimants withdrawing their cases – 27% said they thought they would not win or that it would be a waste of time, 20% said that the tribunal fees (presumably hearing fees) were off-putting and 17% said they found the process too stressful.

The sample is small, but this represents some of the best information we have about reasons for the withdrawal of claims.